The Case for Trans Liberation: A Review of The Transgender Issue

The Case for Trans Liberation: A Review of The Transgender Issue

Shon Faye’s The Transgender Issue: Trans Justice is Justice for All is the first book I’ve read that is solely dedicated to the trans issue. Only… trans people are not an issue at all. They are millions of people fighting to survive. Faye’s pointed and ironic title is the first way that she flips the mainstream treatment of trans people on its head.

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Dreaming of a Free Future: A Review of Becoming Abolitionists

Dreaming of a Free Future: A Review of Becoming Abolitionists

Becoming Abolitionists: Police, Protests, and the Pursuit of Freedom by Derecka Purnell was my first step in my own journey toward abolitionism. I started reading it days after the footage of Tyre Nichols’ murder became public. I’ve known since 2020—embarrassingly late—that policing was a racist institution, and since then I’ve hovered around the “defund the police” area. I didn’t take a hard stance because I didn’t know enough about abolition. But Nichols’ murder, in which five Black cops with body cams used their hands to murder someone, pushed me over the edge. Reform and defunding don’t work. We need abolition.

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Science in Low Places: A Review of A People's History of Science

Science in Low Places: A Review of A People’s History of Science

I love to seek out science history books that tell the stories of unsung heroes. Anything that doesn’t begin and end with Newton, that doesn’t praise Darwin’s work of genius, that doesn’t repeat the somber myth of Galileo’s persecution, is what I want. Clifford Conner’s 2005 book A People’s History of Science: Miners, Midwives, and “Low Mechanicks” exemplifies this worthy retelling of the story of science better than anything I’ve ever read.

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What White Male Supremacy Means for the Rest of Us: A Review of Mediocre

What White Male Supremacy Means for the Rest of Us: A Review of Mediocre

I should have liked Mediocre: The Dangerous Legacy of White Male America by Ijeoma Oluo. I loved Oluo’s first book, So You Want To Talk About Race, and I always learn so much from similar books on racism and feminism.

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White Tears/Brown Scars by Ruby Hamad

The White Power of the Damsel in Distress: A Review of White Tears/Brown Scars

Ruby Hamad’s 2020 book White Tears/Brown Scars: How White Feminism Betrays Women of Color is a paradigm-shifting work that combines history, personal experience, and media analysis to show how the tears of white women are far from harmless. If you think you know feminism—or even if you think you know intersectional feminism—you must read this book.

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Nonfiction November 2022: New to My TBR

Nonfiction November 2022: New to My TBR

A wise woman once said, “[November] is short but also, like, terribly and insufferably long at the same time.”

Nonfiction November started on Halloween, which I believe was about 25 years ago. Now, Thanksgiving is already over and it’s Christmas! And it’s still Nonfiction November!

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Nonfiction November 2022: Worldview Changers

Nonfiction November 2022: Worldview Changers

The time for me to host my first ever Nonfiction November prompt is finally here!

This week, I’m asking you to share the book or books that have changed the way you see the world.

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30 Books That Expose the Truth About Christian Nationalism

30 Books That Expose the Truth About Christian Nationalism

Christian Nationalism, or the malicious use of Christianity as a weapon to strip people of their liberty, is a poison to American democracy. Alarmingly, more than one in three Americans have never even heard of Christian Nationalism. This frequently-updated list of Christian Nationalism books by a full-time advocate for church-state separation will help you and your community understand the crucial facts surrounding this issue. Only when we all fight this insidious system together can we achieve true religious freedom.

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Nonfiction November 2022: Book Pairing (with Documentaries)

Nonfiction November 2022: Book Pairing (with Documentaries)

When I’m not reading, there’s a good chance I’m watching a documentary. I’m using Nonfiction November’s Week 2 prompt, Book Pairing, as an excuse to share my favorites with you!

Here’s the prompt from Rennie of What’s Nonfiction?:

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