Nonfiction November 2022: New to My TBR

Nonfiction November 2022: New to My TBR

A wise woman once said, “[November] is short but also, like, terribly and insufferably long at the same time.”

Nonfiction November started on Halloween, which I believe was about 25 years ago. Now, Thanksgiving is already over and it’s Christmas! And it’s still Nonfiction November!

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Nonfiction November 2022: Worldview Changers

Nonfiction November 2022: Worldview Changers

The time for me to host my first ever Nonfiction November prompt is finally here!

This week, I’m asking you to share the book or books that have changed the way you see the world.

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Nonfiction November 2022: (Christian Nationalism Is) Stranger than Fiction

Nonfiction November 2022: (Christian Nationalism Is) Stranger than Fiction

Week Three of Nonfiction November is all about nonfiction books that almost don’t seem real. Our host, Christopher from Plucked from the Stacks, tells participants, “Basically, if it makes your jaw drop, you can highlight it for this week’s topic.”

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Nonfiction November 2022: Your Year in Nonfiction

Nonfiction November 2022: Your Year in Nonfiction

Nonfiction November is finally here! I love Nonfiction November because I get to share my love of nonfiction with the rest of the book blogging community and somehow end up with even more books on my never-ending to-read and to-buy lists.

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It’s Almost Nonfiction November, the Best Time of Year

It’s Almost Nonfiction November, the Best Time of Year

I am so beyond excited to announce that in a few short weeks, Nonfiction November will be back, and with a brand new host: me!

I participated in Nonfiction November last year in my own quirky way by completing all of the though-provoking prompts in a single post, but in 2022 I’m doing it the way it’s meant to be done, one week at a time. And more than that, I’m hosting week 4!

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Was Science Really Born in Ancient Greece?

Was Science Really Born in Ancient Greece?

There is no question more tempting to the historian of science than the age-old “When did science begin?” The most popular answer to this question has to be “Ancient Greece!” It was Carl Sagan’s answer, and it was Simon Singh’s. This week, I found that it was also Andrew Gregory’s answer.

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Book Review: Bodies on the Line by Lauren Rankin

Book Review: Bodies on the Line by Lauren Rankin

If there is one good thing that has come out of the fight for abortion rights this year, it is that there are so many great books coming out which tell the story from every angle. Published in April 2022, Lauren Rankin’s Bodies on the Line: At the Front Lines of the Fight to Protect Abortion in America is the go-to book to learn about the unsung heroes of the abortion access movement: clinic escorts.

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Book Review: Wrath of Angels by James Risen and Judy Thomas

Book Review: Wrath of Angels by James Risen and Judy Thomas

In the last month, we have heard countless Republicans and anti-abortion advocates trying to use the recent uptick in vandalism against crisis pregnancy centers as proof that the pro-abortion side is the side of violence. James Risen and Judy Thomas’s 1998 book Wrath of Angels: The American Abortion War blows that entire argument out of the water.

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Book Review: Carl Sagan: A Life by Keay Davidson

Book Review: Carl Sagan: A Life by Keay Davidson

All his life, Carl Sagan was troubled by grand dichotomies—between reason and irrationalism, between wonder and skepticism. The dichotomies clashed within him.

. . . In the final analysis, he was the dichotomy: the prophet and the hard-boiled skeptic, the boyish fantasist and the ultrarigorous analyst, the warm companion and the brusque colleague, the oracle whose smooth exterior concealed inner fissures, which, in the end, only one woman would heal.

Keay Davidson, Carl Sagan: A life, p. 1
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