Does Abortion Harm Women? A Review of The Turnaway Study

Does Abortion Harm Women? A Review of The Turnaway Study

In 2007, Supreme Court justice Anthony Kennedy, writing the majority opinion upholding a ban on one abortion procedure performed later in pregnancy, seized an opportunity to weigh in on the emotional and mental state of women who have abortions. He wrote, “While we find no reliable data to measure the phenomenon, it seems unexceptionable to conclude some women come to regret their choice to abort the infant life they once created and sustained. Severe depression and loss of esteem can follow.” Clearly, in 2007, there was a serious need for reliable data on the consequences of abortion.

Diana Greene Foster, The Turnaway Study, p. 4
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When Christian Nationalists Control the Court: A Review of American Crusade

When Christian Nationalists Control the Court: A Review of American Crusade

If I could summarize Andrew Seidel’s new book American Crusade: How the Supreme Court is Weaponizing Religious Freedom in one word, I would say it is difficult. At times it is difficult to comprehend due to legal jargon (even after the author purposely trimmed the fat, so to speak) but it is immensely difficult to stomach. This was a book I had to read slowly and take plenty of breaks from. It wasn’t a fun book, and it wasn’t intended to be.

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Book Review: Jesus and John Wayne by Kristin Kobes Du Mez

Book Review: Jesus and John Wayne by Kristin Kobes Du Mez

Since its release in June 2020, Kristin Kobes du Mez’s Jesus and John Wayne: How White Evangelicals Corrupted a Faith and Fractured a Nation has been required reading for anyone seeking to gain a full perspective on the Christian Nationalist movement in the United States and how it got this way.

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I Read the Gab CEO’s Awful New Christian Nationalism Book So You Don’t Have To

I Read the Gab CEO’s Awful New Christian Nationalism Book So You Don’t Have To

Let’s be clear: a Christian Nationalist is not a person you want to be. But leave it to Christian Nationalists to embrace Christian Nationalism, and to make it look like the right thing to do.

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Book Review: Of Popes and Unicorns by David Hutchings and James Ungureanu

Book Review: Of Popes and Unicorns by David Hutchings and James Ungureanu

Of Popes and Unicorns: Science, Christianity, and How the Conflict Thesis Fooled the World by David Hutchings and James C. Ungureanu is one of the most enjoyable books I have ever read.

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Was Science Really Born in Ancient Greece?

Was Science Really Born in Ancient Greece?

There is no question more tempting to the historian of science than the age-old “When did science begin?” The most popular answer to this question has to be “Ancient Greece!” It was Carl Sagan’s answer, and it was Simon Singh’s. This week, I found that it was also Andrew Gregory’s answer.

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Book Review: Bodies on the Line by Lauren Rankin

Book Review: Bodies on the Line by Lauren Rankin

If there is one good thing that has come out of the fight for abortion rights this year, it is that there are so many great books coming out which tell the story from every angle. Published in April 2022, Lauren Rankin’s Bodies on the Line: At the Front Lines of the Fight to Protect Abortion in America is the go-to book to learn about the unsung heroes of the abortion access movement: clinic escorts.

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Book Review: Wrath of Angels by James Risen and Judy Thomas

Book Review: Wrath of Angels by James Risen and Judy Thomas

In the last month, we have heard countless Republicans and anti-abortion advocates trying to use the recent uptick in vandalism against crisis pregnancy centers as proof that the pro-abortion side is the side of violence. James Risen and Judy Thomas’s 1998 book Wrath of Angels: The American Abortion War blows that entire argument out of the water.

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Book Review: Carl Sagan: A Life by Keay Davidson

Book Review: Carl Sagan: A Life by Keay Davidson

All his life, Carl Sagan was troubled by grand dichotomies—between reason and irrationalism, between wonder and skepticism. The dichotomies clashed within him.

. . . In the final analysis, he was the dichotomy: the prophet and the hard-boiled skeptic, the boyish fantasist and the ultrarigorous analyst, the warm companion and the brusque colleague, the oracle whose smooth exterior concealed inner fissures, which, in the end, only one woman would heal.

Keay Davidson, Carl Sagan: A life, p. 1
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Book Review: Reproductive Justice: An Introduction by Loretta J. Ross and Rickie Solinger

Book Review: Reproductive Justice: An Introduction by Loretta J. Ross and Rickie Solinger

Everyone knows that access to abortion is a critical human rights issue. The potential overturning of Roe v. Wade is more than unconstitutional, it’s inhumane. An unjust human rights violation. But the worst part? As many activists have said, it’s the floor, not the ceiling, of reproductive justice. That’s where Loretta J. Ross and Rickie Solinger’s Reproductive Justice: An Introduction becomes crucial to understanding what that ceiling might look like.

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