Science in Low Places: A Review of A People's History of Science

Science in Low Places: A Review of A People’s History of Science

I love to seek out science history books that tell the stories of unsung heroes. Anything that doesn’t begin and end with Newton, that doesn’t praise Darwin’s work of genius, that doesn’t repeat the somber myth of Galileo’s persecution, is what I want. Clifford Conner’s 2005 book A People’s History of Science: Miners, Midwives, and “Low Mechanicks” exemplifies this worthy retelling of the story of science better than anything I’ve ever read.

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What White Male Supremacy Means for the Rest of Us: A Review of Mediocre

What White Male Supremacy Means for the Rest of Us: A Review of Mediocre

I should have liked Mediocre: The Dangerous Legacy of White Male America by Ijeoma Oluo. I loved Oluo’s first book, So You Want To Talk About Race, and I always learn so much from similar books on racism and feminism.

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White Tears/Brown Scars by Ruby Hamad

The White Power of the Damsel in Distress: A Review of White Tears/Brown Scars

Ruby Hamad’s 2020 book White Tears/Brown Scars: How White Feminism Betrays Women of Color is a paradigm-shifting work that combines history, personal experience, and media analysis to show how the tears of white women are far from harmless. If you think you know feminism—or even if you think you know intersectional feminism—you must read this book.

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It’s Almost Nonfiction November, the Best Time of Year

It’s Almost Nonfiction November, the Best Time of Year

I am so beyond excited to announce that in a few short weeks, Nonfiction November will be back, and with a brand new host: me!

I participated in Nonfiction November last year in my own quirky way by completing all of the though-provoking prompts in a single post, but in 2022 I’m doing it the way it’s meant to be done, one week at a time. And more than that, I’m hosting week 4!

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Book Review: Jesus and John Wayne by Kristin Kobes Du Mez

Book Review: Jesus and John Wayne by Kristin Kobes Du Mez

Since its release in June 2020, Kristin Kobes du Mez’s Jesus and John Wayne: How White Evangelicals Corrupted a Faith and Fractured a Nation has been required reading for anyone seeking to gain a full perspective on the Christian Nationalist movement in the United States and how it got this way.

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Book Review: Of Popes and Unicorns by David Hutchings and James Ungureanu

Book Review: Of Popes and Unicorns by David Hutchings and James Ungureanu

Of Popes and Unicorns: Science, Christianity, and How the Conflict Thesis Fooled the World by David Hutchings and James C. Ungureanu is one of the most enjoyable books I have ever read.

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Book Review: Reproductive Justice: An Introduction by Loretta J. Ross and Rickie Solinger

Book Review: Reproductive Justice: An Introduction by Loretta J. Ross and Rickie Solinger

Everyone knows that access to abortion is a critical human rights issue. The potential overturning of Roe v. Wade is more than unconstitutional, it’s inhumane. An unjust human rights violation. But the worst part? As many activists have said, it’s the floor, not the ceiling, of reproductive justice. That’s where Loretta J. Ross and Rickie Solinger’s Reproductive Justice: An Introduction becomes crucial to understanding what that ceiling might look like.

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Book Review: The Girls Who Went Away by Ann Fessler

Book Review: The Girls Who Went Away by Ann Fessler

No matter what I say about this book, it won’t be enough. It would be a lot quicker for me to just tell you to read it for yourself, but in this review I will try my best to explain why.

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Book Review: The Last Stargazers by Emily Levesque

Book Review: The Last Stargazers by Emily Levesque

Last weekend, I was supposed to be at the Freedom From Religion Foundation’s 2021 National Convention in Boston. It would have been my first freethought conference ever. I had every second of our two days in Boston planned, down to dinner reservations, outfits, and bookstores. The five books I wanted signed were packed in my backpack, and my nails were even painted galaxy to be on-theme (even if no one noticed but me).

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36 Crucial Quotes from Ibram X. Kendi’s How to Be an Antiracist

36 Crucial Quotes from Ibram X. Kendi’s How to Be an Antiracist

If you have read Ibram X. Kendi’s bestseller How to Be an Antiracist, then you know that it is an absolute must-read. Kendi clearly explains why and how racism is sustained—and how it affects every group of people in dozens of intersecting ways—and he uses these facts to demonstrate how to dismantle it. While I definitely recommend that you read the entire book, here are some of my favorite quotes.

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