The Birth of Roe: A Review of Jane Against the World

The Birth of Roe: A Review of Jane Against the World

In the post I wrote one year ago, Why the March for Life is Not Pro-Life, I remarked that Roe v. Wade wasn’t likely to see its 50-year anniversary, and I was right. It is a heavy weekend for abortion rights supporters, but that is all the more reason for us to continue to fight back.

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Science in Low Places: A Review of A People's History of Science

Science in Low Places: A Review of A People’s History of Science

I love to seek out science history books that tell the stories of unsung heroes. Anything that doesn’t begin and end with Newton, that doesn’t praise Darwin’s work of genius, that doesn’t repeat the somber myth of Galileo’s persecution, is what I want. Clifford Conner’s 2005 book A People’s History of Science: Miners, Midwives, and “Low Mechanicks” exemplifies this worthy retelling of the story of science better than anything I’ve ever read.

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What White Male Supremacy Means for the Rest of Us: A Review of Mediocre

What White Male Supremacy Means for the Rest of Us: A Review of Mediocre

I should have liked Mediocre: The Dangerous Legacy of White Male America by Ijeoma Oluo. I loved Oluo’s first book, So You Want To Talk About Race, and I always learn so much from similar books on racism and feminism.

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White Tears/Brown Scars by Ruby Hamad

The White Power of the Damsel in Distress: A Review of White Tears/Brown Scars

Ruby Hamad’s 2020 book White Tears/Brown Scars: How White Feminism Betrays Women of Color is a paradigm-shifting work that combines history, personal experience, and media analysis to show how the tears of white women are far from harmless. If you think you know feminism—or even if you think you know intersectional feminism—you must read this book.

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Nonfiction November 2022: New to My TBR

Nonfiction November 2022: New to My TBR

A wise woman once said, “[November] is short but also, like, terribly and insufferably long at the same time.”

Nonfiction November started on Halloween, which I believe was about 25 years ago. Now, Thanksgiving is already over and it’s Christmas! And it’s still Nonfiction November!

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Nonfiction November 2022: Worldview Changers

Nonfiction November 2022: Worldview Changers

The time for me to host my first ever Nonfiction November prompt is finally here!

This week, I’m asking you to share the book or books that have changed the way you see the world.

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Nonfiction November 2022: (Christian Nationalism Is) Stranger than Fiction

Nonfiction November 2022: (Christian Nationalism Is) Stranger than Fiction

Week Three of Nonfiction November is all about nonfiction books that almost don’t seem real. Our host, Christopher from Plucked from the Stacks, tells participants, “Basically, if it makes your jaw drop, you can highlight it for this week’s topic.”

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Nonfiction November 2022: Book Pairing (with Documentaries)

Nonfiction November 2022: Book Pairing (with Documentaries)

When I’m not reading, there’s a good chance I’m watching a documentary. I’m using Nonfiction November’s Week 2 prompt, Book Pairing, as an excuse to share my favorites with you!

Here’s the prompt from Rennie of What’s Nonfiction?:

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Does Abortion Harm Women? A Review of The Turnaway Study

Does Abortion Harm Women? A Review of The Turnaway Study

In 2007, Supreme Court justice Anthony Kennedy, writing the majority opinion upholding a ban on one abortion procedure performed later in pregnancy, seized an opportunity to weigh in on the emotional and mental state of women who have abortions. He wrote, “While we find no reliable data to measure the phenomenon, it seems unexceptionable to conclude some women come to regret their choice to abort the infant life they once created and sustained. Severe depression and loss of esteem can follow.” Clearly, in 2007, there was a serious need for reliable data on the consequences of abortion.

Diana Greene Foster, The Turnaway Study, p. 4
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